Archive for the ‘genre-educational’ Category

Code Combat: Open Source Javascript Tutorial Gamification (In A Good Way)

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

Code Combat is a javascript programming learning IDE wrapped in a delicious cute RPG/2D RTS packaging that runs in the browser without any plugins. They recently announced their open source/free art release.

The current set of Code Combat tutorials starts with directional movement and activation of pre-programmed behavior, continues with coordinate movement and targeting and conditional behavior and continues towards prediction calculations.

Editor GUI

There is an editor, officially described as “broken”. I can confirm that the text editor was slow when I tried using it. :)

All in all, a very exciting project. I have noticed a few possible drawbacks so far:

  • It’s not yet clear which parts will not remain proprietary. It looks like the excellent humor (writing) unfortunately will do so (legal page).
  • The music tends to be too exciting to code to.
  • There’s a CLA requirement for contributing.
What do you think? Persuaded to work on a HTML5 game yourself perhaps, seeing that this performs okay? :)

Flock 2013, OLCP Games, Gamification through Badges on Linux

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013
There were some game development related events at Flock Fedora Contributor Conference, August 2013 in lovely Charleston, SC, US.

Trigger Rally Map Workshop 

So far my contributions to Fedora were merely a few wiki edits but my conference proposals were well-received.

Free Art Game Making presentation slide

I ended up speaking about making games using free art and leading a Trigger Rally level building workshop (video).

Fedora badges

At the conference, I learned about Fedora’s badge program and that it is connected to Mozilla Open Badges.

Lemonade Stand (OLPC) Sugar “activity”

Another discovery: Lemonade Stand, which is an educational game developed by people from FOSS@RIT, who work on bringing Mozilla Open Badges to the OLPC.

Game development appears to be getting more and more of a foot in the door at free software conferences, so I encourage people working on open games to apply as speakers at conferences, talking about technical and social aspects of free, open source game development project leadership and contribution. (Not just at FOSS events, why not at general game dev events as well?)

If you have any relevant talks from recent events to point out, please do so in the comments!