Archive for the ‘flare’ Category

Jedi Knight source-code liberated & Flare 0.18

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

In a pretty surprising move the source-code of the idTech3 based games Jedi Knight 2: Jedi Outcast and Jedi Academy were released under the GPL by Activision and Raven Software. You can find the original source drops here and here.
The content is obviously still propitiatory (e.g. you need to buy it), but some people have already plans to upgrade the source as OpenJK (most likely back-ports from ioQuake3) and make a Linux version most likely.
Would be also cool if a nice stand-alone FOSS 3rd person sword-fighting game would come out of this… but the detailed player animations will likely be the biggest road-block.

Ahh well… and since I hate posting something with no pictures or videos I include the pretty nice new Flare 0.18 release:

It includes some pretty nice new features too:

  • 10 Equipment Slots, up from 4 (and easily configurable)
  • Starting “Class” choice (beginner’s power/item kit)
  • Environmental/Ambient Sounds on maps
  • Much improved handling of Animations, Effects, and Sounds
  • New Powers: Stealth, Traps, Thrown Weapons
  • New Item Bonuses: XP gain, Gold Find, Item Find, and more
  • Improved support for various input devices
  • Two new starting quests

That’s all for now :)

Crowdfunding Games Into Freedom

Thursday, October 18th, 2012
Two games recently started “Kickstarter”-style campaigns on IndieGoGo with part of the offer being “becoming open source”:
  1. Monster 2, a JRPG which has been open source for a while but then was closed during a upgrade of game data/content, will be released under the Give it Your Own License, License if it reaches its goal of USD 1500,-.
  2. Tumblegonk, a yet unreleased simple puzzle game, will be released under GPL if it reaches its goal of USD 850,-.

Is this how open source games should receive at least a bit of funding? I wouldn’t mind if some old commercial or freeware titles would do such a step (which can’t really be repeated for the same project/game). It’s not a sustainable principle of course though.

There are few alternatives of making money with open source game development that comes to mind:

  1. Make the engine open source and the game data freeware but sell it on closed platforms, like Frogatto (iOS version is for-pay).
  2. Port existing open source games to closed platforms like in the case of Word War Vi (iOS version is for-pay – read the original developers’ thoughts on this in this forum post).
  3. [Warning: self-promotion] Sell additional, proprietary game data extra, while having the engine and base assets available under free licenses, like Nikki and the Robots (Story Episodes are proprietary and for-pay).
  4. Donations. Some open source games accept them. The only game with compelling data on this is FLARE. I don’t know of any open source games that fund full-time development through donations.

What I would really love to see is commission-based advertisement-games being developed in JavaScript, with at least their source code being released under open source licenses. But HTML5/JavaScript might not be there yet in the eyes of promoters and in the infrastructure of ad-services…

Oh, and Bitcoin! We need more Bitcoin action! FOSS game developers! Open up a wallet on for example blockchain.info and share your wallet address! As for Flattr… I don’t know any more…

There is a long and old discussion about whether it is possible to make money and on TumbleGonk’s crowdfunding campagin on our forums.

Four persons behind FLARE RPG development

Friday, July 13th, 2012
FLARE has an excellent new website and a series of contributor interviews:

The latest release is 0.16.

Open Source Game Summer Screen Shorts 2012 #1

Wednesday, July 4th, 2012
Knights, a top-down multiplayer quest/fighting game, received some GUI enhancements.

Tales of Gydia, a Liberated Pixel Cup fantasy turn-based RPG that focuses on UGC, was started on SourceForge.net.

Unknown Horizons, a historical city-building and economy RTS, received some new citizen building graphics from a first-time contributor.

Black Dog, an extremely atmospheric HTML5, fully-FOSS helicopter mini-game, got its (unfinished) Android port released.

Linus Torvalds not only showed his annoyance with Nvidia but also his love towards open source games in a recent talk (goto 58m20s).

ctdabomb, an active community member, converted and license-clarified the Art Museum SuperTuxKart racing track over the time span of about one and a half months, after asking the community for support.

SuperTux, a cute platformer, needs help finishing an animated owl sprite. To the left, you can see the current placeholder graphics.

unrelated monster spawner animation

FLARE, a hack’n'slash RPG engine and game, requested translations via email, pull request or forum post.