Archive for the ‘contest-gamedev’ Category

Winter Shorts 3: PyWeek #16 in April, Rainbow Rooms, Valyria Tear on OS X

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

PyWeek #16 in April

PyWeek logo

PyWeek is a game jam that obviously goes on for one week and requires the use of Python. It takes place online and there are overall winners in team and solo categories, as well as awards. The dates of the 16th PyWeek challenge are 00:00 UTC April 14, 2013 to 00:00 UTC April 21, 2013. Registration opens on 15. March 2013.

There is a message board for the community and there are interesting methods to publish Python games as HTML/JavaScript using pyjs, as demonstrated by the PyWeek #15 entry Kaos.

License Requirements: At least Shared Source required. Free software licenses recommended.

PyWeek #15 Entry: Rainbow Rooms

Rainbow Rooms is a physical-nonsense-maze puzzle game based on libtcod.

Various fonts are being used, some of which might be problematic license-wise for including in for example Debian’s official repositories but it should be possible to replace them in less than two hours including research and documentation.

Code License: GPLv2
Content License: Unclear

Valyria Tear: “Final Release of Half-Episode I”

New Valyria Tear GUI screens

Valyria Tear Half-Episode I has been released, which I suppose we can take as 50% of Episode I’s acts being complete.

The release brings new graphical interfaces and development is ongoing.

An OS X version can now also be grabbed from the OSX thread.

Code License: GPLv2
Content License: Various (DFSG approved)

FLAT: Innovative Allegro-made 7DFPS+ is Open Source

Saturday, July 28th, 2012
image: lethal battle scene in FLAT

FLAT combines ice skating and shooting in an atmospheric ice scenario.

I haven’t been able to progress too far but exploring the movement has been interesting alone.

If you feel like getting dirty with Allegro 5, there are many enhancement tickets open.

Liberated Pixel Cup July 2012: Coding Phase

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012
The Content Creation Phase of the Liberated Pixel Cup is over!


You might want to ignore this blog post and read their announcement instead.


Here is a partial preview of the results:

More, not so nice previews: [part1, part2]



18 minute preview of all .flac files (two .ogg files excluded):
Download from box.net [mp3, 17M or ogg, 13M]


Get all files from opengameart.org/lpc-art-entries in .zip format:
Download from mediafire.com [link, 185M], box.net [part1, 96M | part2, 90M]

Now it is time for the Coding Phase of the Liberated Pixel Cup!

Rules:

  • Start: July 1st, 12:01 AM Pacific Daylight Time
  • End: July 31st, 11:59PM Pacific Daylight Time
  • License:  Code entries must be free and open source, and must be available under the GNU GPL 3.0.  You may optionally release the code under any additional license(s) that you choose.
  • Source code:  You must provide the complete source code for your entry.  Any code you have written for your game prior to the beginning of the contest must be made available at the beginning of the contest.
  • Platform:  Your code must be able to be compiled and run on a 100% free-as-in-freedom platform.  It may not make use of any proprietary libraries or VMs.  Just to be clear, we cannot accept games that will ONLY run on one of the following:  Flash, Silverlight, XNA, Unity, Windows, MacOS , Mac OS X, iOS, proprietary JVMs, or similar.  It is perfectly acceptable if your game runs on any of these platforms, but it must also work on an open platform (we strongly recommend making sure that your program run on modern flavors of GNU/Linux, as all of the judges will have access to it).
  • Framework:  You may use an existing engine or framework, or build your game from scratch.

Judging Criteria:

  • Consistency of style:  Your game should primarily make use of the art either provided for or entered into the contest.  You may add additional art if needed, but all original art included in the game must be available under the CC-BY-SA 3.0 License and the GNU GPL 3.0 (existing art from other sources may be under any free-as-in-freedom license).
  • Ease of use:  Your game should be easy to compile and run.  You won’t be disqualified automatically if a judge is unable to run your game, but it will count against you.  You are advised to avoid having large numbers of obscure dependencies or requiring bleeding edge (unstable) libraries.
  • Creativity:  Games will be judged on how creatively they use the artwork.
  • Judge’s opinion:  How much the judges like your game.

Good luck and great Success!

7DFPS – Open Source Prototypes (2012)

Sunday, June 17th, 2012
Of about 150 entries at the first seven day first person shooter development jam (7DFPS), so far I could identify two prototypes that have clear open source licensing in their code and run.

Note that this contest did not require sources to be released, only 19 entries had theirs released at time of writing.

Cannonball Z is a game where you shoot zombies with cannonballs. It features randomly generated maps.The source code is in the .zip file. The engine uses a BSD license. My code is GPL and my assets are CC BY-SA.

OxyFPS is a simple first person shooter with the restriction of being in an oxygen-lacking environment.You are on an airless planet with only a suit, a crossbow and a tank of air.Your objective is to survive as long as you can while the corporate goons that caused this terraforming catastrophe hunt you down.

Then there’s also Jedi-Academy–Renaissance, which I haven’t been able to compile yet and Zombies in the Dark, which is only indirectly GPL-ed by being hosted on Google Code.

By the way: I participated in a project with my beginner Blender abilities but only the art assets are freely licensed.